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Wow.

Kareem Mayfield and Raymond Serrano did a lot of holding, Mayfield did a lot of wild swinging between the hugs. Serrano wishes he held more.

In a so-so fight with more than enough holding/grabbing to make you wonder if anything will even have a chance of happening, BOOM goes Kareem Mayfield.

With the last seconds dwindling down on round four, Mayfield dipped his right should down and unleashed a ridiculous overhand right that crushed Serrano quite literally as the bell rang to end the round.

Serrano ate the punch flush and immediately crumbled to the canvas, with little-to-no movement.

The ref started the count and Serrano staggered (horribly) to his feet. The count stopped and the ref asked Serrano to step towards him. Serrano took one step then literally fell forward into the ref.

How the referee allowed the fight to continue is beyond me and (thankfully) it didn’t end in Serrano getting seriously injured by the head hunting Kareem Mayfield in the 5th round, where the fight ended by stoppage at 47 seconds into the round.

For Serrano it was a disappointing performance and other than a few flashes I didn’t see anything that leads me to believe he can ever seriously challenge for a world title (for whatever they are worth these days).

Mayfield on the other hand showed me something, at times. There were flashes of a fighter that, with more seasoning, could possible contend for a world title. It’s too soon now, but his competition has been strong and he has performed at a very high level in running his record to a now glowing 16-0-1 with 10 KO’s.

He did have his faults though. He needs to fight within himself more. He’s far too wild for long stretches, looking for the homer, when he should work the jab and compose himself for longer stretches. If Mayfield can pull himself together and keep the wild flinging of punches to a low number he can be very good.

Undercard: Read the rest of this entry »

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I’m probably more excited than most for this fight. What can I say, I’m a life-long fan of the sport and this sort of event (big PPV matchup between two of the sports best) is something real boxing fans yearn for.

It’s not even the actual fight that gets me all riled up (initially anyway), it’s the build up. The press conferences, the articles, the TV coverage, the weigh-in and then, finally, the “main event of the evening” (said in my best Michael Buffer voice).

When done right, these events collide to build anticipation, an anxiousness that drives you to tell anyone, everyone, “I really cannot wait for this fight…” Or maybe that’s just me. That’s the thing with boxing though. All that build-up, all that talking, all that anticipation and it could all be for naught if the fight is a dud.

A lot of Floyd Mayweather Jr’s (42-0, 26 KO’s) fights are duds these days. It’s mostly a result of his style. A style that he has nearly perfected since moving out of his offensive comfort zone that was 130 lbs. Floyd was never a slugger, but he used to attack, at least try for the kill. He no longer does that. Now he waits. Along with becoming as masterful as you can be defensively, he has become of the greatest counter punchers ever. It all fits into his above 130 lbs style of fighting.

Most of his opponents are forced into a false aggression that usually amounts to very little because when they have a chance to throw, they don’t. The reason being they know how good a counter puncher Floyd is and that he will strike like a viper when given the opportunity. Therein lies what turns his fights from spectacles in the build-up, to dud by the end of the fight. Floyd rarely goes out of his way to be outright offensive and even though everyone he fights knows that aggression is the best way to beat him they refuse to let their hands go when given the opportunity to do so. So Floyd ends up sticking his jab in their face and throwing enough to win every round, while his opponent feints, flinches and flails.

I believe Floyd Mayweather Jr will easily win this fight. My rational brain just keeps telling me there’s no way Miguel Cotto (37-2, 30 KO’s) has what it takes to beat someone so talented.

My emotional heart tells me differently. (This happens often to me.) My rational, logical brain uses reason and common sense, my heart will read into things that aren’t there and imagine, “If he could just do *this* (insert strategy here), he can beat this guy!”

What I have talked myself into this time is that Floyd’s punches, while deadly accurate, don’t hold the power required to discourage Cotto from keeping pressure in his face. I even think Cotto could taste Floyd’s most crisp punch and decide to go balls-to-the-wall after taking the punch and realizing he can absorb what Floyd throws while using his own vaunted body attack.

Cotto is, probably, the best body puncher in boxing. A skill almost no Floyd opponent has successfully applied (to their own detriment). Add that to the fact that Miguel has a very accomplished jab to set up those thudding body shots and we could have ourselves a fight.

If Cotto does manage to degenerate the fight into some sort of war of attrition, how does Floyd handle that? We all know Miguel Cotto has been in more than his fair share of bloody, drag down wars, but Floyd has avoided such fights. In my memory I can only think of two times when Floyd was in real trouble. The first is his first fight with Jose Luis Castillo back in 2002 and in one of his more recent fights against Sugar Shane Mosley. In the second round of his fight with Shane, he took a pair of hard, crisp right hands that shook him and don’t let anyone fool you, he was lucky to survive that round.

My point is that if Miguel Cotto is willing to sacrifice taking punishment to his face in large amounts to beat the shit out of Mayweather’s body, he can turn the fight into something different from a normal Floyd back-pedal fest.

I wouldn’t be surprised if Cotto made this fight close, but I’m going to lean towards the side of common sense and use my brain for my pick; Read the rest of this entry »


He wasn’t the strongest, fastest, or most talented fighter, and he took way too many punches, but he was a man in that ring.

He was a man in that ring like few others have been a man in that ring. He never gave up and he never surrendered. Gatti was one of a currently and rapidly diminishing breed of fighter. Not that there isn’t a group of fighters who bring the same warlike craziness to the table as Gatti, it’s just that the number is dropping dramatically as the years go on.

I may say these things because I’m biased, I openly admit to being as big an Arturo Gatti fan as there is.

I grew up watching his fights, watching his unerring intestinal fortitude, his ability to look as if he would literally be murdered in the ring and in the face of everyone telling him he must stop, he refused. He refused because he would not go quietly into that good night, he would go out in a blaze of fire. He would go down swinging.

Happy 40th Arturo.

I’ll leave you with one of the greatest rounds that you’ll ever see, featuring Mickey Ward;


Joe DeGuardia’s Star Boxing is making a return to Albany’s Times Union Center.

Star Boxing was last in Albany February 4th when Joe Hanks defeated Rafael Pedro via 2nd round TKO in the main event.

From Star Boxing;

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ESPN2’S FRIDAY NIGHT FIGHTS HITS THE TIMES UNION CENTER IN ALBANY, NY ON MAY 18TH
Raymond Serrano vs. Karim Mayfield Headline

BRONX, NY (March 30, 2012) Joe DeGuardia’s Star Boxing returns to the Times Union Center in Albany, New York with ESPN2’s Friday Night Fights on Friday, May 18th.

Priced at $75, $50, $40 and $30, advance tickets go on sale this Thursday, April 5th and are available through Ticketmaster, (www.Ticketmaster.com, 800-745-3000) or at the Times Union Center Box Office, (1-800-30-EVENT), and at select Wal-Mart Music Centers. Tickets are also available by calling Star Boxing at 718-823-2000 or on www.starboxing.com.

The May 18th event marks the return of Star Boxing to the Times Union Center, following an action packed debut on February 4th.

Headlining ESPN2’S Friday Night Fights is a terrific junior welterweight ten round bout between 22 year old undefeated Philadelphia prospect Raymond “Tito” Serrano, 18-0-0 (8KO’s) and the also unbeaten and defending NABO Champion Karim “Hard Hitta” Mayfield, 15-0-1 (9KO’s) of San Francisco, California.

“We’re very excited to return to the Times Union Center and the great boxing fans in the Albany, New York region with ESPN2’s Friday Night Fights. The support we received from the fans and media for our first show convinced us to bring another terrific event to the area” said DeGuardia.

“Serrano and Mayfield each understand this is an outstanding opportunity and we expect a sensational fight from the opening bell.”

A native of Puerto Rico, Serrano returns to ESPN2’s Friday Night Fights following a dominant ten round decision win over Kenny Abril on February 10th at the Mohegan Sun Casino. A pro since the age of 18, Serrano is seen by many in boxing as having the skills needed to become a world champion.

The big talking Mayfield is coming off two excellent wins in 2011, a tenth round stoppage of former world champion Stevie Forbes on June 17th in Austin, Texas and a ten round decision over Patrick Lopez on October 1st in Tunica, Mississippi.

Additional bouts on this card will be announced shortly by Star Boxing.

The Times Union Center is location at 51 South Pearl Street in Albany, New York, 12207. Doors on the night of the event will open at 6:30pm with the first bell scheduled for 7:30pm.


At least Dereck Chisora (15-2, 9 KO’s)emphatically signed his death warrant.

By slapping Vitali Klitschko (43-2, 40 KO’s)in the face during their “stare down”, Chisora all but guaranteed he will be KO’d. Chisora has made repeated claims of how he is going to knock out Vitali in their bout scheduled for tomorrow (Feb 18, Epix & EpixHD.com). Yet a much more accomplished fighter (and better power puncher) in Lennox Lewis all but hit him in the face with a sledgehammer and Vitali didn’t even get shaken.

Since the fight is tomorrow I’ll go ahead and throw my official prediction out there;

Chisora doesn’t have nearly enough experience, size, or punching power to do the damage necessary. Vitali will throw that thunderous jab and wait until Chisora opens himself up, allowing Vitali to exploit that opening and turn it into a barrage of unyielding power punches.

Vitali Klitschko by 5th round TKO.

The upcoming boxing schedule just got a huge shot in the arm as HBO announced Yuriorkis Gamboa (21-0, 16 KO’s) vs. Brandon Rios (29-0-1, 22 KO’s) for April 14. I should have listed this fight on my Fight Fights Wishlist post, just a gross oversight on my part. Read the rest of this entry »


The first televised fight was between “The Filipino Flash” Nonito Donaire and Wilfredo Vazquez Jr. I had envisioned this fight as a knockout for Donaire.

Two things I felt would happen; 1) that Donaire would carry his power well into 122 lbs (after moving up from 118 lbs), and 2) that Vazquez would wilt under Donaire’s pressure.

I wasn’t totally wrong on point 1, but point 2 I was clearly wrong on. Vazquez was more than up to the challenge of absorbing some very solid punches from Donaire, even though he clearly went down in round 9, he got back up and continued as if he took nothing more than a good hard shot.

The early rounds were easily won by Nonito. So easily won that I thought the fight would turn into a rout, but the next two rounds Vazquez settled into a good place and began to stick his (surprisingly) effective jab into Donaire’s face.

Those two rounds (5 & 6) were Vazquez’s best rounds and the only rounds he actually won on my card. While he had other good rounds he didn’t do enough to actually pull out the round on my card. Donaire had a solid, yet slightly flawed performance in his first fight at 122 lbs.

After Donaire ripped Fernando Montiel’s soul from his body in February 2011, I was all in on Donaire. I was ready to anoint him the next big star. I was jumping in with both feet.

I now amend my feelings and I’m taking one of those feet back out.

While he won the fight easily in my eyes, he had several “What the hell are you doing?” moments. There where times when he should have pressed and instead decided to clown around, jumping around the ring like a monkey instead of pressing a possibly wilting fighter in Vazquez.

Wilfredo is a tough fighter and showed as much during the fight taking clean hard shots in several rounds, but absorbed nearly all of them and kept fighting. His main problem during the fight was his inability to pull the trigger and engage. When he did engage he looked good, he didn’t throw or land nearly enough to win enough rounds and make the fight close.

For what it’s worth my card ended up at 118-109 for Donaire.

Donaire still can achieve becoming a full-fledged super star in the boxing world, he just needs to settle down in a fight and focus. Focus like he did against Fernando Montiel.

In my opinion I would like to see Donaire up one more weight class. A move to 126 lbs and an early summer fight against a solid fighter there (maybe Daniel Ponce De Leon or Jhonny Gonzalez) before a fall showdown with the ultra fast Yuriorkis Gamboa.

For what it’s worth my card ended up at 118-109 for Donaire.

(As a side note, there was yet another ridiculous scoring card from a judge. This time that judge was Ruben Garcia who scored the fight 115-112 for Vazquez Jr. That card is a travesty and insulting. Something needs to be done about these judges who cannot possibly be scoring the fight in front of them. In no way, shape, or form did Vazquez win this fight. Disgusting. The other two judges appropriately scored the fight 117-110.) Read the rest of this entry »


Floyd Mayweather Jr. has taken the initiative recently in trying to secure what would be the richest fight in the history of boxing. Just yesterday be placed a call to his possible foe, Manny Pacquiao.

Mayweather provided details on the call in an email to ESPN anchor Stan Verrett stating;

“I called him and asked him about fighting May 5 and giving the World what they want to see. I also let him know we both can make a lot of money. He ask about a 50/50 split and I told him no that can’t happen, but what can happen is you can make more money fighting me then you have made in your career.”

The email continues, but I have to stop there.

I’ve been on Mayweather’s side recently as he called out Manny on Facebook, Twitter, and in various interviews in an attempt to secure the fight. I prayed it would draw out Manny and get him to force his obstinate promoter, Bob Arum, to make the fight. Read the rest of this entry »


From Fightnews.com;

The WBC ordered by unanimous votes that the mandatory defense of WBC middleweight champion Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. has to be against the diamond champion Sergio Martinez but also allowed that if both parties reach an agreement, they can have voluntary defenses and then the winner of each bout fight between them for the WBC title. Chavez Jr called WBC President Jose Sulaiman to ask his approval for his voluntary defense on February 4, so the Sulaiman called Sergio Martinez who accepted that Chavez Jr. be allowed to fight because he will also fight in March, so both boxers agreed to a fight between them after their voluntary defenses.

Chavez Jr & Top Rank head, Bob Arum (Photo courtesy: Chris Farina/Top Rank)

My thoughts:

I applaud the WBC for forcing Chavez Jr’s hand and making the next defense of his title against Sergio Martinez, but it doesn’t really matter what they do. If Chavez Jr refuses to take the fight against Maravilla then Chavez Jr will just be stripped of his title.

Stripping a fighter of his title used to mean something. That has gone by the wayside these days. I realize this is a generality, but most boxers don’t care for titles like they used to. Oh sure if they win one it’s an extremely exhilarating feeling, but now they care more for how many zero’s are at the end of their check.

Chavez Jr’s own people said they wouldn’t want to take a fight with Maravilla because it isn’t worth it to them monetarily. In other words, they know Martinez would expose Chavez for the mediocre talent that he really is.

I would be thoroughly surprised it Chavez Jr actually steps into the ring with Martinez, so would Top Rank (Chavez Jr’s promoter). He will most likely

The better match-up, in my opinion, would be a Julio Cesar Chavez Jr vs. Saul “Canelo” Alvarez fight. It would be The Battle for Mexico and would probably shatter all sorts of Mexican viewership/gate records.


Amir Khan vs. Lamont Peterson for Khan’s WBA & IBF junior welterweight titles

Wow.

In one word that would be how I would describe the fight between Amir Khan and Lamont Peterson.

Simply a fantastic fight. After a rough first round for Peterson, where he had a slip and was knocked down, he had a solid second round. After the second round though it was “on”. Peterson began to masterfully work Khan to the body. Khan didn’t pay nearly as much attention to Peterson’s body, but work upstairs with awesome hand speed that Peterson had trouble with the entire fight.

The fight had numerous ebbs and flows as Peterson would take control and back Khan against the ropes with hard shots to the body and once against the ropes he would gash Khan with vicious uppercuts. Khan would respond to this by pushing Peterson off of him, repeatedly. Eventually Khan would be penalized a point in round 7 (justified, in my opinion) and against in round 12 (slightly less justified). Khan would turn the tables and use his superior hand speed and quickness to throw multiple punch combinations and jump out of reach before Peterson would mount any counter attack.

Throughout the exchanges it appeared that Khan clearly had the faster hands and Peterson was demonstrably better on the inside.

The point deductions unfortunately had an impact on an otherwise action packed and exciting fight. Read the rest of this entry »


It appears from this that Mr. Money can’t carry on a decent disagreement without becoming rather flustered.

After all the talking he’s done in his life and on his episodes of 24/7 when no one is there to actually answer him, this was fun to listen to. He picked on decrepit old Larry Merchant in the ring after his win over Victor Ortiz and now he got jerked around by some radio announcer that I’ve never heard of (his name turns out to be Rude Jude).

Floyd is so good at talking the talk when no one is around except his entourage, but whenever he is actually pushed by someone he stutters, stammers, can’t complete sentences and then just invariably calls the person a “faggot” or pulls the race card out. He’s definitely got a quick trigger on the “faggot” gun, just ask his own father Floyd Sr, who he called that on the Ortiz-Mayweather 24/7.

http://www.worldstarhiphop.com/videos/e/16711680/wshhawFVuubxau5Bjp21

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